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Designated Orders 9/24/2018 – 9/28/2018: Understand the Remand; No Proof, No Relief

Posted on Oct. 17, 2018

This week’s designated orders are brought to us by Samantha Galvin of the University of Denver. The last case Samantha mentions involves an unsuccessful motion for reconsideration under Tax Court rule 161. Keith previously covered motions for reconsideration on PT here. Christine

During the week of September 24, 2018, the Court designated four orders: two for cases previously covered in Caleb Smith’s October 3rd post, and two for cases where petitioners offered no evidence to support their positions. First, as a very quick follow up – the Court denied the remaining portion of Tribune Media Company’s motion to compel the production documents (order here). If you are interested, see Caleb’s post (here) for the background and more information on this order and the first order discussed below.

Understand the Remand

Docket No. 22224-17, Johnson and Roberson v. C.I.R. (designated order of 9/29/18 here; most recent order here)

When we last saw this case, Caleb explained that notes in the administrative file suggested that petitioners had not received a SNOD, and as a result, a remand to Appeals seemed imminent. The IRS does not object to a remand, but petitioners do object, so the case is set for trial during the week of October 15th. In its designated order of September 29, the Court takes steps to ensure that petitioners understand the consequences of objecting to a remand. The Court explains that many petitioners benefit from remands, and that any supplemental determination is eligible for judicial review. In the alternate scenario, if there is no remand and the Court decides that Appeals’ determination cannot be sustained- that finding of abuse of discretion alone does not bar the IRS from future collection activity.

There is a misconception among some taxpayers who believe if they can prove that IRS made a mistake, they’ll be absolved of their tax liability – we all know this is not the case. Although not receiving the SNOD allows petitioners to raise issues related to the underlying liability, a reduction or elimination of that liability is not guaranteed. In the present case, petitioners will have the burden of proving their charitable contributions, medical expenses, and business expenses claimed as miscellaneous deductions.

The next two orders share a common designated orders’ theme, which is “petitioners who do not provide evidence to support their claims.”

No Proof, No Levy Release

Docket No. 25627-17SL, Hommertzheim Enterprises, Inc. v. C.I.R (Order and Decision here)

This first instance of a petitioner without proof is in Court after a CDP hearing for unpaid employment taxes. This case also has another common designated orders’ theme, which is “neither the IRS, nor the Court, can help the taxpayer who fails to do what they’re asked to do.” I assume here (and have assumed in previous posts) that these types of orders are frequently designated to provide guidance to taxpayers about their responsibilities in a CDP hearing and the Court’s jurisdiction over CDP hearings, which makes me think CDP hearings would run more smoothly if the IRS would instruct taxpayers to read Procedurally Taxing as a part of the process (ha ha).

In this case the IRS requests a collection information statement, unfiled returns, and proof of quarterly tax deposits. Petitioner provided one of the three unfiled returns, copies of two previously filed (but not requested) returns, and nothing more. The new return showed a balance which the settlement officer said would need to be paid before an installment agreement could be considered; although, I don’t understand why this balance couldn’t be included in any proposed agreement.

The levy is sustained, and petitioner explains in its petition (in all capital letters, presumably to convey anger and frustration) that all documents were faxed, they were never told how to make a payment arrangement, and thus were unable to make it.

Despite the explanation, petitioner does not offer any evidence to prove that it faxed all of the documents and the administrative record supports the IRS’s position that only one of the requested documents was received. As a result, the Court finds there is no abuse of discretion, grants the IRS’s motion for summary judgment and sustains the levy determination.

No Proof, No Reconsideration

Docket No. 25105-12L, Robinson and Jung-Robinson v. C.IR. (order here)

This order involves petitioners’ motion for reconsideration. The crux of petitioners’ argument is that the Court lacks jurisdiction because the ASED had already expired when the parties executed an agreement to extend it, but again, petitioners did not offer any evidence to support this. Whereas the IRS refers to exhibits that show the ASED had been extended until ten months after the notice of deficiency was issued.

As a reminder, or for those of you who don’t know, a motion for reconsideration is generally only granted when there is a substantial error or unusual circumstances, so without evidence from petitioners it’s no surprise the Court denies their motion.

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